University of Alaska Fairbanks | Project Jukebox

Jukebox is the digital branch of the Oral History Program at UAF. The Oral History Program was established in 1981 to collect and curate audio and video recordings that relate to various aspects of Alaska's history and the people who have contributed to its rich heritage. The collection contains over 11,200 individual recordings, including interviews with politicians, pioneers, and Native elders. 

Project Jukebox was developed in 1988 as a way to integrate oral history recordings with associated photographs, maps, and text. The idea was to bring old dusty recordings hidden on the shelves of the archives and make them more accessible to the public, and to offer broader understanding of the context for an interview than the recording alone could provide.

Today, Project Jukebox provides broad digital access to full oral history recordings synced with transcripts and searchable through either a table of contents or by theme. Each jukebox also includes photographs, maps, and other associated materials to provide context for the interviews. Currently, there are over 50 Jukebox projects from throughout Alaska, each specific to a topic or an area. 

 
 
 Bob King, John Wachtel, Katie Ringsmuth, Sharon Thompson and Carvel Zimin documenting the buildings at the NN Cannery in preparation for a Nomination of the site to the National Register of Historic Places.

Bob King, John Wachtel, Katie Ringsmuth, Sharon Thompson and Carvel Zimin documenting the buildings at the NN Cannery in preparation for a Nomination of the site to the National Register of Historic Places.

 
LaRece Egli